30 DECLINING OCCUPATIONS

 dakota 2

30 OF THE FASTEST DECLINING OCCUPATIONS

Check out Books on Growing you Career

Worried that technology improvements or the struggling economy might soon cost you your job? While a prediction isn’t a guarantee, employment predictions from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics show that some occupations are expected to decline in the near future.

The projections, which are updated every two years, show that the total number of people employed in the United States will have increased 10 percent — by 15. 6 million — between 2006 and 2016. Not all jobs, however, are on the rise. Check out this list of 30 jobs expected to be among the fastest declining.

(Sources: Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Occupational Outlook Handbook and Career Guide to Industries.)
============

Model makers and patternmakers, wood

Number employed in 2006: 4,000
Percent change in 2016: Model makers, -40.8 percent; patternmakers, -39.9 percent
Education/training: Most woodworkers are trained on the job, but employers also look for a high school diploma, and computer and math skills. Woodworkers are increasingly expected to have some secondary education in the field as well, whether from a technical school or college.

2006 median salary: Model makers, $28,470; patternmakers, $31,510;

Job outlook: Technology improvements will cut into job availability for these workers. However, there will still be opportunities for those who know how to create and produce designs on a computer.

More info on woodworkers

============

Photographic process workers and processing machine operators

Number employed in 2006: 73,000
Percent change in 2016: Photographic process workers, -36.3 percent; photographic processing machine workers, -49.8 percent

Education/training: High school graduates with mathematical and computer skills, and some experience in the field, are desired for these positions. Most training is received on the job.

2006 median salary: Photographic process workers, $23,280; photographic processing machine workers, $19,500

Job outlook: Jobs in this field will decline rapidly as digital cameras, which continue to drop in price, become the equipment of choice for professional and amateur photographers.

============

Textile machine setters, operators, and tenders

Number employed in 2006: 122,000

Percent change in 2016: From -24.3 percent for winding, twisting, and drawing out machine workers, to -30.9 percent for knitting and weaving machine workers.

Education/training: Skills are typically learned on-the-job, but manual dexterity and mechanical aptitude are necessary as well. Apprenticeships and other forms of formal, in-house training can last up to two years.

2006 median salary: From $21,620 to cutting machine workers, to $24,290 for knitting and weaving machine workers.

Job outlook: Jobs in textiles will suffer as US companies, under pressure to increase production and contain costs, increasingly import clothing and textiles. Many new textiles also require less production and processing.

More info on textile workers

============
Credit, file, new account, and order clerks
Number employed in 2006: 655,000
Percent change in 2016: -27.8 percent
Education/training: On-the-job training is usually provided, and different positions may require additional courses.

2006 median salary: Salaries range from $22,090 for a file clerk to $29,970 for an order clerk.

Job outlook: All of these careers will be negatively impacted by technology improvements and office automation.

More info on credit clerks

More info on file clerks

More info on order clerks

============

Bookbinders and bindery workers

Number employed in 2006: 72,000
Percent change in 2016: Bindery workers, -21.8 percent; bookbinders, -16.9 percent
Education/training: A high school diploma or an associate degree is preferred, and workers will receive on-the-job training. These jobs are ideal for the detail oriented and mechanically inclined.

2006 median salary: Bindery workers, $25,570; bookbinders, $30,260

Job outlook: Technological improvements have changed the way the bookbinding industry operates. More books are printed in-house rather than sent to specialty shops, while other work is being lost to foreign companies that can produce materials that traditionally take longer at a cheaper rate.

More info on bindery workers

============

Radio operators

Number employed in 2006: 2,000
Percent change in 2016: -16.3 percent
Education/training: This an entry-level position that usually entails on-the-job training.
2006 median salary: $37,890

Job outlook: More radio stations are switching to remote operation of programming and transmitters, which will eliminate many jobs.

More info on radio operators

============

Machine tool cutting setters, operators, and tenders, metal and plastic

Number employed in 2006: 513,000
Percent change in 2016: From -14.9 percent for cutting, punching, and press machine workers, to -23.3 percent for lathe and turning machine setters.
Education/training: A high school diploma, classroom training in shop and blueprint reading, a solid math and computer background, and knowledge of the properties of metal and plastic can all help a worker setting out in this career. Training begins with observing and assisting experienced workers.

2006 median salary: From $26,340 for cutting, punching, and press machine workers, to $32,160 for lathe and turning machine setters.

Job outlook: The implementation of labor-saving machinery, the changing demand for goods, and foreign competition will all lead to the rapid decline of these types of job opportunities.

More info on machine operators

============

Pumping station operators

Number employed in 2006: 29,000
Percent change in 2016: From -11.9 percent for wellhead pumpers, to -17.5 percent for gas compressor and gas pumping station operators
Education/training: There may not be any formal education requirements for many of these positions, but employees who handle toxic chemicals receive education in safety awareness and procedure.
2006 median salary: From $36,150 for wellhead pumpers, to $45,400 for gas compressor and gas pumping station operators

Job outlook: The need for these workers will decline because of continued productivity increases in the industry.

More info on pumping station operators

============

Coating, painting, and spraying machine setters, operators, and tenders

Number employed in 2006: 106,000
Percent change in 2016: -12.9 percent
Education/training: Training is usually provided on the job and can last anywhere from a few days to a few months. Becoming skilled in all aspects of the job can take from a year to two years.
2006 median salary: $26,830

Job outlook: The automation of painting and coating techniques will raise worker productivity, eliminating the need for many employees.

More info on painting and coating workers

============

Wallpaper hangers

Number employed in 2006: 10,000
Percent change in 2016: -12.2 percent
Education/training: Technical school or apprenticeships lasting two to four years are a great way to gain a combination of classroom and paid on-the-job training that could. There are few informal training opportunities.
2006 median salary: $34,190

Job outlook: The need for paperhangers will decline as more modern decorative finishes, such as faux effects and sponging, gain in popularity at the expense of paper, vinyl, or fabric wall coverings.

More info on paperhangers

============

Floor layers, except carpet, wood, and hard tiles

Number employed in 2006: 29,000
Percent change in 2016: -12.2 percent
Education/training: Floor layers receive on-the-job training, beginning with learning the basic tools of the trade. They will also learn to prepare floor surfaces, and to cut and install floor covering.
2006 median salary: $34,190

Job outlook: Floor layers who install laminate, cork, rubber, and vinyl will encounter rapid job decline as these materials are used more infrequently.

More info on floor layers

============
Communications equipment operators
Number employed in 2006: 209,000
Percent change in 2016: Switchboard operators, -12.1; telephone operators, -39.5.
Education/training: Most receive a combination of on-the-job training and classes that last from a few hours to a few weeks. Customer service training is common for switchboard operators.
2006 median salary: Switchboard operators, $22,640; telephone operators, $34,140.

Job outlook: Opportunities for switchboard and telephone operators are expected to decline rapidly because of the growth of technology, including voice recognition systems.

More info on communications equipment operators

============

Refractory materials repairers, except brickmasons

Number employed in 2006: 3,500
Percent change in 2016: -11.5 percent
Education/training: These employees receive moderate-term on-the-job training.
2006 median salary: $34,190

Job outlook: These workers, who build or repair furnaces, kilns, boilers, and ovens, will experience rapid job decline.

More info on refractory materials repairers

============

Railroad brake, signal, and switch operators

Number employed in 2006: 25,000
Percent change in 2016: -11.4 percent
Education/training: Railroads require a minimum of a high school diploma, and typically provide formal training and on-the-job training for their employees.
2006 median salary: $48,860

Job outlook: These job opportunities will decline as remote control locomotive technology becomes more prevalent.

More info on railroad brake, signal, and switch operators

============

Weighers, measurers, checkers, and samplers, recordkeeping

Number employed in 2006: 79,000
Percent change in 2016: -11.3 percent
Education/training: Weighers, measurers, checkers, and samplers weigh, measure, and check materials, supplies, and equipment in order to keep accurate records. Most of these positions require a high school diploma or equivalent, but computer experience is a plus. Skills such as operating a forklift, which is used to transport the materials to the scale, are learned through on-the-job training.
2006 median salary: $25,370
Job outlook: In this field too the growing use of automated equipment will be responsible for the elimination of many jobs.

More info on weighers, measurers, checkers, and samplers

============

Pharmacy aides

Number employed in 2006: 50,000
Percent change in 2016: -11.1 percent
Education/training: Most receive on-the-job training, with employers looking for at least a high school diploma, as well as strong customer service skills.
2006 median salary: $20,950
Job outlook: Decline is due to pharmacy technicians taking on many of the responsibilities of pharmacy aides, such as answering phones, stocking shelves, and administrative tasks.

More info on pharmacy aides

============

Shoe and leather workers

Number employed in 2006: 20,000
Percent change in 2016: Shoe and leather workers and repairers, -10.3 percent; store machine operators and tenders, -35.7 percent
Education/training: Skills are typically learned on the job, but manual dexterity and mechanical aptitude are necessary as well. Apprenticeships and other forms of formal, in-house training can take up to two years.
2006 median salary: Shoe and leather workers and repairers, $20,450; store machine operators and tenders, $21,910
Job outlook: The field will decline rapidly as companies import less expensive foreign shoes. The demand for shoe repair has also declined as more people opt just to buy a new pair of shoes.

More info on shoe and leather workers

============

Meter readers, utilities

Number employed in 2006: 47,000
Percent change in 2016: -10.3 percent
Education/training: This is an entry-level position for which a high school diploma is preferred. People who are interested in a career in utilities use this position as a stepping stone and experience builder.
2006 median salary: $30,330

Job outlook: New technology that allows meters to be monitored and billed from a central location will eliminate many of the jobs of meter readers.

More info on meter readers

============

Telemarketers

Number employed in 2006: 395,000
Percent change in 2016: -9.9 percent
Education/training: Short-term on-the-job training and good phone and sales skills are all that are typically required.
2006 median salary: $24,190

Job outlook: Decline will come as a result of more people opting out of receiving sales calls from salespersons, and as call-blocking technology improves.

============

Printers

Number employed in 2006: 317,000
Percent change in 2016: From -5.7 percent for printing machine operators, to -21.2 percent for pre-press technicians and workers.
Education/training: Traditionally, press workers have received on-the-job training. However, employers are now looking for candidates with printing experience and knowledge of new digital technology.
2006 median salary: From $30,990 for printing machine operators, to $33,310 for pre-press technicians and workers.

Job outlook: The size of printing staffs is expected to decline because of improvements in printing technology. However, those with computer skills may still be able to find job opportunities.

More info on printing machine operators

More info on prepress workers

============

Floral designers

Number employed in 2006: 87,000
Percent change in 2016: -8.9 percent
Education/training: Floral designers generally aren’t required to have a degree, and most learn their skills on the job.
2006 median salary: $21,700

Job outlook: The decline will mostly affect the wholesale market, as more shops purchase flowers and supplies directly from growers. Still, job opportunities will still exist because there is high turnover in retail floral design.

More info on floral designers

============

Purchasing agents and buyers, farm products

Number employed in 2006: 16,000
Percent change in 2016: -8.6 percent
Education/training: It depends on the size of the firm, but applicants generally start as trainees, purchasing clerks, or junior buyers and advance as they acquire certifications. Some require bachelor’s degrees.
2006 median salary: $53,730
Job outlook: The decline is due mainly to agricultural and grocery-related consolidation.

More info on farm product purchasing agents and buyers

============

Farmers and ranchers

Number employed in 2006: 1,058,000
Percent change in 2016: -8.5 percent
Education/training: While many farmers receive their training on the job, getting a 2-year or 4-year degree at an agriculture school is becoming more important. Good managerial skills are important to successfully making a living in this industry.
2006 median salary: $43,520
Job outlook: The decline in farmers and ranchers continue as farms consolidate. However, as a generation of farmers retire in the next decade, there will be opportunities for new farmers, especially those who produce corn used for ethanol.

More info on farmers and ranchers

============f

Projectionists

Number employed in 2006: 11,000
Percent change in 2016: -8.4 percent
Education/training: Short-term on-the-job training.
2006 median salary: $20,180

Job outlook: The movie industry has become increasingly concerned that digital movie piracy could threaten theater attendance. Also, more theaters in the future will be capable of projecting films digitally.

More info on motion picture projectionists

============

Postal service mail sorters, processors, and processing machine operators

Number employed in 2006: 198,000
Percent change in 2016: -8.4 percent
2006 median salary: $46,900
Education/training: Postal service workers receive on-the-job training from experienced employees and classroom instruction on safety and defensive driving.
Job outlook Sorting devices, scanners, and optical readers will replace the traditional staff needs of the post office.

More info on postal service workers

============

Radio and television announcers

Number employed in 2006: 59,000
Percent change in 2016: -8.3 percent
Education/training: Formal broadcasting training from a college or technical school is valuable. Long-term on-the-job training is also common.
2006 median salary: $36,120

Job outlook: The consolidation of radio and TV stations, the growth of other media sources, and new technology are contributing to the decline. Also, the field is very competitive, with many more job seekers than jobs.

More info on radio and television announcers

============
Stock clerks and order fillers
Number employed in 2006: 1,705,000
Percent change in 2016: -7.7 percent
Education/training: The job is usually learned under close supervision. On-the-job training includes shelf stocking and the use of automated equipment.

2006 median salary: $20,440

Job outlook: Computers and automated equipment will cut largely into the need for clerks and order fillers in such capacities as inventory.

More info on stock clerks and order fillers

============

Data entry and information processing workers

Number employed in 2006: 492,000
Percent change in 2016: -7.2 percent
Education/training: Employers look for candidates with a high school diploma, prior word processing or data entry experience, and accurate, fast typing skills when hiring.
2006 median salary: The median salary of word processors and typists was $29,430, and the median salary of data entry keyers was $24,690.

Job outlook: Job opportunities for word processors and typists will decline the most, as more people own personal computers and do their own typing. Positions in data entry will fall as well, but at a slightly lower rate due to the cost of purchasing new technology such as barcode scanners and voice-recognition software.

More info on data entry workers

============

Forming machine setters, operators, and tenders, metal, and plastic

Number employed in 2006: 161,000
Percent change in 2016: From -7.2 percent for extruding machine workers, to -30.4 percent for forging machine setters, operators, and tenders.
Education/training: A high school diploma, classroom training in shop and blueprint reading, a solid math and computer background, and knowledge of the properties of metal and plastic can all help a worker excel in this career.
2006 median salary: From$28,250 for extruding machine workers, to $31,050 for rolling machine workers,

Job outlook: Labor-saving machinery, the changing demand for goods, and foreign competition will all lead to the rapid decline of these types of jobs.

More info on forming machine operators

Thanks to http://www.boston.com/jobs/2013/12/30/the-fastest-declining-occupations/PRZVnJg25iIBgJFyv70BxN/story.html

Shop at:
Eco Friendly Products
Be Eco Friendly and shop our Green Product Stores.
Eco Friendly gifts Save the Planet.

Ultra Mortgage Solutions
See Your World for Less
Shop Green & Eco Friendly
Shopping Mall

This entry was posted in Advice For Retirement, Career After 50 and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *